Fruit enroute

As you travel accross the country by public means what stands out is that at almost every major stop theres some locally organised fruit vending… Tip is always carry loose money and receive the goods before paying (do not alight unless your conductor has allowed)

Tunneled houses of Chagga

msonge-chagga-hse

msonga – chagga huts ©muokikioko2016

Traditionally banana farmers, the chagga of Northern Tanzania one of the largest tribes of Tanzania built huts known as ‘msonga’

Most interesting about these ‘msonga’ is you could ‘songa’/move from one hut to another without stepping out of the hut…the secret?

highly spiritual, the chagga are known to mix christianity with traditional beliefs (like most africans) 🙂 and mostly occupy the areas around ‘moshi’ and ‘arusha’.

Sub- terrainian houses of Arusha

The ‘warrique’ communities of Northern Tanzania who live around Arusha built houses on the sides of hills which they used in times of war, especially with the maasai community.

What was special about them was the house was part of the hill ie it was sub-terrenial, allowing for escape through tunnels in the hills. The community called them  ‘Assemo’

Tinga Tinga Art

image

Tinga Tinga Art ©muoki kioko 2006

An Art form prevailant and distinct to  Tanzanians sought after by many Art collectors who package it for resale in Europe.

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Children will Always be children

image

I don’t know why whenever I see this image that statement always comes to mind. What is it that draws children to water?
Place them there and you have to literally pluck them out due to cold or lateness. Taken in coastal Tanganyika

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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Tanzania-Kenya border tour vehicle rows

Who’s FOOLING Who??

Tasota wants status of tour
operators’ vehicles to stay
unchanged in EA
BY THE GUARDIAN REPORTER
21st February 2014

The Tanzania Society of Travel
Agents (Tasota) has said the denial of entry of tour operators’ vehicles from other East African countries should remain unchanged.
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=65046

today

Kenya prevents Tanzania motor
vehicles from entering JKIA
BY CHARLES NGEREZA
5th January 2015
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=75961

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015
Tanzania tour vans barred from
JKIA and all parks
NATION MEDIA
By YVONNE KAWIRA

Tanzanian-registered tour vans will no longer be allowed to access Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and game parks in Kenya.
East African Affairs, Trade and
Tourism Cabinet Secretary Phyllis Kandie said a three-week window requested by Tanzania to allow both countries to discuss and sort out the issue had elapsed.
“The meeting to discuss these issues has not taken place,” Ms Kandie said.
“Those three weeks have now expired without our Tanzanian counterparts convening the meeting for the negotiations,” she noted. Ms Kandie said the government had, as a result, resolved to implement the bilateral agreement between Kenya and Tanzania signed in 1985 to ensure fairness of trade between the two countries.

TANZANIA’S REFUSAL
The decision to invoke the bilateral agreement was taken following Tanzania’s refusal to allow Kenyan vans into the country.
The agreement stipulates how
tourism operations between the two countries should be conducted.
It provides that tour vans drop off holidaymakers at convenient points in their respective countries as opposed to an earlier arrangement where tourists were being dropped off at border points. (http://www.nation.co.ke/news/Tanzania-vehicles-barred-from-Kenya-s-parks-and-airports/-/1056/2614970/-/ax2kfcz/-/index.html)

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?
If you visit World famous Serengeti and want to see the famous river crossing in the Mara (same ecosystem), you will have to check out of your lodginging to do a days trip round to a border point and say bye to your tour driver/guide at the border.
Insanity of this is that even a Tanzanian visiting Serengeti & booked in a Tanzanian lodge can’t visit the river crossing on the Kenyan side as part of their morning park drive, they get to a point in the park and explain to their children – you see that tree line 100metres ahead of us is the famous Mara crossing for these animals but to see it we have to book out of our hotel and the park and then travel the whole day round trip to a border to book new park fees and hotel. While we are at it, we will have to leave our vehicle in Tanzania to book a Kenyan one to see that river crossing 100metres infront of you. mmm

OR

You climb Kilimanjaro [in Tanzania] and want to view premium Amboseli National Park at its foot [in Kenya], either you climb & descend with ALL your belongings into Kenyan kilimanjaro border post for an onward safari with new guide/vehicle or do an about 100kms+ round trip to say bye to your tour guide/vehicle at another official border crossing

– in both options it means starting new relationships with new drivers & guides on either sides of your safari.

Same applies to guests on the Kenyan side.

*sounds childish & inconvinient to guests??

Kilimanjaro Airport now being upgraded to handle 1.5 million passengers a year
http://arushatimes.co.tz/front%20page_1.html

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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Dodoma wood curvers

image

Dodoma©muoki kioko 06

Dodoma, is the administrative capital of Tanzania. A ‘small’ town when I visited that had all the signs of administrative incentives to grow it as a hub.
What took me there were curvings and curvers like Fred above. A group of dedicated curvers who’s products cannot be missed as long as you’ve traveled through that country! What I found interesting was that despite their products being a symbol of travel through the country, when you get to Dodoma you can’t even tell that curvers exist let alone that products uniquely Tanzanian originate from here.
Products from here include daggers, sword’s, walking sticks and pen casings made from an endemic black/purple wood that’s decorated using copper wire. Pen casings most times have tanzania written using the copper wire on them and my take was that these gentlemen could create one with your name on it.
* word of caution, journey there by public means can be treacherous both in the booking and characters you’ll meet along the way. But that didnt apply to all, the gentleman above was honest, hardworking family man – we called him Fred.

Copyright Reserved
All images and Text
Muokisphotography@yahoo.com
2009 – 2014
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